Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Tribute to Heroes

Saturday the Cornhusker Chapter of the American Red Cross held their annual Tribute to Heroes dinner to recognize 9 people who performed exemplary service to their community and fellow man during 2009.  Two nominees submitted by the police department were among the honorees.  Well, actually, two humans and one dog. 

The first pair was Officer Jeff Urkevich and his K9 partner, Jake.  Jeff and Jake intervened with a troubled man who was threatening to commit suicide. When he learned the police had been called, he fled the residence.  Jeff and Jake tracked him down and made sure he got the mental health help he needed.

The second was Chuck Jeffers, a citizen who witnessed the aftermath of a bank robbery and took action.  Chuck saw a man running from a branch bank (that was a clue), and getting into a vehicle.  He followed the getaway, while calling 911 to ask if the bank had just been robbed.  After learning that he was indeed following the bank robber, Chuck stayed on the line with the dispatcher, and calmly vectored the police officers in for an intercept a couple miles away. 

Congratulations to Jeff, Jake, Chuck, and all the award winners!

19 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thats nice.

Anonymous said...

Well-done! Speaking of a citizen following a suspected criminal until the police are vectored in, didn't this guy do the same drunken-hit-and-run thing just last year? Is he even off probation for that one yet? How long did he have his OL back before he went out and did it again?

Steve said...

Did Jeffers get any kind of reward for his efforts? (Other than a moment in the limelight?)

Anonymous said...

Here's the link to the whole story, excellent. http://cornhuskerredcross.org/Tribute_to_Heroes.php

Anonymous said...

It's too bad there are officers who do heroic things that don't get any recognition either because they are not popular or they have a lazy supervisor.

Anonymous said...

Chief,
That was an example of a very good use of a cell phone. In large cities in the UK there are government funded surveillance cameras all over the place. Here in Lincoln there are probably several thousand citizens on the street with video capable cell phones at all hours of the day. These potential resources of information could be utilized by your officers at very little cost to the taxpayers. Maybe you could have one of your interns set up some kind of system where LPD could use this potential resource.

Gun Nut

Anonymous said...

Great work Chuck! So many people would look the other way, thank you for helping!

Steve said...

What is "Thats"?

Anonymous said...

Observant, concerned citizens are a terrific force multiplier.

ARRRRG!!!! said...

Way to go guys!

Gump said...

Poohbear(1188),
My mon says congrats.

Anonymous said...

11:13 Any person on the department can recognize good deeds done by by a fellow employee or civilian by emailing/calling/in writing, the Captain or the Chiefs. It doesn't have to be your Sgt. Also check out the KUDOS under the label cloud.

Anonymous said...

TO 11:13. Please enlighten us with your heroic tale that your "lazy supervisor" didn't go goo goo ga ga over. We would all like to hear it. Then we can all call the chief's office in the morning to request you get your award.

Anonymous said...

That's nice 4:38. That doesn't change the fact that there are lots of officers that aren't recognized for things they have done.

Anonymous said...

Chief-Heroism has always been interesting to me. The recognized heroes usually share one common trait in my mind and that is being lucky enough to be at the right place, at the right time. Then reacting to a situation with some courage and using your training and practice.

I've always felt that coppers have an opportunity to be someone's hero nearly every day, although usually unrecognized. Making the little kid smile, stopping a violent domestic from becoming a homicide, calming any traumatic situation, taking a drunk driver off the road before he kills someone are but a few examples. Officers can make a difference every day, although it sometimes feels like no one notices or cares.

256

Steve said...

Not to diminish what some of you officers are saying about not being recognized, but do you think anyone recognizes the vast majority of non-cops for doing the job they do? I'd bet cops get recognized more than the average Joe. Don't get me wrong, I definitely appreciate the job you folks do. However, statistically, it is not the most dangerous or difficult job there is. I believe far more construction workers and farmers are killed doing their jobs, and I seldom see any of them being recognized for anything.

You have to take some satisfaction in knowing you did a good job, and not depend on recognition from others.

Anonymous said...

Steve-I agree that people need to get satisfaction from their jobs for a job well done and shouldn't expect recognition.

But your stats are off. There are a lot more construction workers and farmers than there are cops, and the reality is they generally kill themselves by doing something stupid with a piece of equipment.

They are not killed by someone solely because of the fact they are wearing a uniform and have sworn to protect us citizens by putting themselves into harms way.

95% of policework can be routine, somewhat boring, but still valuable work being done. The other 5% of the time is when someone like you or me needs help. And at that time I'm not calling my farmer friends or the guy that just poured my new sidewalk.

Not to diminish them for what they do in any way.

256

Anonymous said...

4:38 here. eeek. Chill out 7:14! I only intended to say there are others who CAN make sure non-comm and comm get recognized.

J.J. said...

To Steve --

Mr. Jeffers also won the Citizen Meritorious Conduct Award, which is the highest civilian award bestowed by the Lincoln Police Department and, in this case, greatly deserved.