Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Bad selection

One of the better "what was he thinking?" stories to land someone in jail on Christmas Eve (so far, that is--the day is young) occurred around 3:00 AM, when veteran officer Tim Abele pulled over a motorist near 48th and Old Cheney for a traffic violation. The motorist didn't have a driver's license with him, and provided a name that proved to be fictitious.

He gave the false name because his driver's license was suspended, and he had a history of failing to appear in court. He knows the system well, and he knew he would be going to jail if he provided his real name, rather than merely receiving a ticket for no license on person. Here's the problem: he picked the name of a former roomie. His old buddy, however,...

You guessed it, was also suspended, and also has a history of failing to appear in court. At the jail, the  he false identity was quickly discovered, as the defendant has been a guest on prior occasions. Note to self: when picking someone's name in order to lie about identity to police, try to choose someone who isn't suspended just like self, and doesn't have prior arrest warrants for failing to appear in court, just like self.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

HO...HO...HO. Merry Christmas T. Trish

Steve said...

I realize it's not up to the police what happens to people like this once they do go to court, but my guess is he'll have his license re-suspended, or revoked, or some such other nonsense that will do absolutely nothing to keep him off the streets where he is apparently incapable of driving within the rules and probably poses a danger to others.

Tom Casady said...

True, Steve. Very frustrating. You hope you never encounter a guy like this in a traffic crash.

Anonymous said...

He'll probably be back driving, and in a car that belongs to another owner (parent/BF/BF/etc), so that the serial DUS driver can exploit the loophole preventing the impoundment/seizure of vehicles operated but not owned by the serial DUS offender. Leasing the vehicle works to avoid impoundment too, because the leasing company technically owns the vehicle.

Anonymous said...

JOB SECURITY!

Watchful said...

7% of drivers are suspended and also 7% are driving without insurance.


It sure seems to me that it would be easy to enact a law where a license plate could be somehow "marked" Maybe a highly reflective sticker to be put over the year license plate tab (heaven forbid putting a sticker on someone's Yugo or Lexus) which would be, by law, a reason to stop the car.


If a person has a suspended or revoked license or is convicted of DUI or no insurance, the vehicle gets the sticker for a full year.


When an officer sees the reflective sticker and pulls over the driver, unless they have the necessary items to drive, arrest the person and impound the car with maybe a 90 day hold before whoever owns it is able to get it back, even if the owner is not the driver.


Getting pulled over 2 or 10 times a day can be considered part of "the penalty" associated with the sentence. A hassle sure, but I bet people learn to behave more readily if something like this were employed.